Every week, the folks at InVision send a roundup of their best blog content, their favorite design links from the week, and a new opportunity to win a free t-shirt. (Seriously. They give away a new design every week.) They also sometimes have fun survey questions where they crowdsource for their blog. This week's, for example, asked subscribers what they would do if the internet didn't exist.
In 2002 the European Union (EU) introduced the Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications. Article 13 of the Directive prohibits the use of personal email addresses for marketing purposes. The Directive establishes the opt-in regime, where unsolicited emails may be sent only with prior agreement of the recipient; this does not apply to business email addresses.
Email marketing has evolved rapidly alongside the technological growth of the 21st century. Prior to this growth, when emails were novelties to the majority of customers, email marketing was not as effective. In 1978, Gary Thuerk of Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) sent out the first mass email[1] to approximately 400 potential clients via the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET). He claims that this resulted in $13 million worth of sales in DEC products,[2] and highlighted the potential of marketing through mass emails.
I very much enjoyed your article. I currently send out a daily news blog to about 3,100 recipients. The program I use is not on your list, and I am shopping around for someone new. My biggest challenge is spam filters blocking my message. This seems to happen because of the appended coding that tracks click-throughs. However, it may also be because of my send-frequency. I’ve also discovered that the domain of the company I’m using has found its way to gray lists, and I often have to get my subscribers to add various domains to their safe-sender/white lists. It’s frustrating. So, my long winded question is – do different providers have varying ‘deliverability’ ratings? (PS – I use Mail Chimp on behalf of several small non-profits I do work for, and so am familiar with their services – but am curious about the others).

In addition to satisfying legal requirements, email service providers (ESPs) began to help customers establish and manage their own email marketing campaigns. The service providers supply email templates and general best practices, as well as methods for handling subscriptions and cancellations automatically. Some ESPs will provide insight and assistance with deliverability issues for major email providers. They also provide statistics pertaining to the number of messages received and opened, and whether the recipients clicked on any links within the messages.

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