However, as email marketing developed as an effective means of direct communication, in the 1990s, users increasingly began referring to it as "spam", and began blocking out content from emails with filters and blocking programs. In order to effectively communicate a message through email, marketers had to develop a way of pushing content through to the end user, without being cut out by automatic filters and spam removing software.
For example, if you set up an autoresponder with an interval of 24 and you receive an email from user@example.com at 8:00 AM on Monday, the autoresponder immediately responds to the message. If, however, user@example.com continues to email you throughout the day, the autoresponder does not send another response for 24 hours after the initial email (in this case, 8:00 AM on Tuesday). If user@example.com emails you again after the 24-hour interval expires, the system sends them an autoresponse. 

These often compact agencies or single experts are specialized in email deliverability. Making sure that the email hits the inbox. They are able to solve deliverability (email goes to spam!) problems. Think about managing on-premise or their own servers, or otherwise once there is some real concern / problems with email deliverability, blacklisting, etc.
Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service. 

I very much enjoyed your article. I currently send out a daily news blog to about 3,100 recipients. The program I use is not on your list, and I am shopping around for someone new. My biggest challenge is spam filters blocking my message. This seems to happen because of the appended coding that tracks click-throughs. However, it may also be because of my send-frequency. I’ve also discovered that the domain of the company I’m using has found its way to gray lists, and I often have to get my subscribers to add various domains to their safe-sender/white lists. It’s frustrating. So, my long winded question is – do different providers have varying ‘deliverability’ ratings? (PS – I use Mail Chimp on behalf of several small non-profits I do work for, and so am familiar with their services – but am curious about the others).
And that leads us right into understanding service pricing and packaging. The email marketing services we reviewed range from about $5 per month to as much as $20 per month for a range of features. Many email marketing plans include unlimited email sends each month and bill you based on the number of subscribers. If you have a small list, then look for a company that offers a free plan, a low-cost plan for several hundred subscribers, or even a pay-as-you-go plan. On the flip side, many of these services also offer high-volume plans with up to 100,000 or more contacts. Sometimes this requires a custom plan that has to be arranged directly with a sales rep. If you're willing to commit, then look for the companies that offer discounts if you pay yearly rather than monthly. A few offer also money-back guarantees.
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